Biologist Turned Filmmaker Shares Skills

David Lickley (Director)

As a kid, David Lickley dreamed of rocking the world as a famous folk singer. He hit it big, but in a different way—as a documentary filmmaker.

“I began as a biologist and a musician,” Lickley told Scholastic News in a recent interview. “I was into music and biology, so I started to do small soundtracks for other people’s work.”

He moved into filming the animals he was studying, which lead to directing documentaries. Now, with more than 25 years of filmmaking experience, Lickley is the Director of Large Format Films for Science North, a leader in science education. He not only directs documentaries, he is a writer and producer as well.

“The job of the producer is to get the project going, and to watch over the project,” he said. “The job of the director is more of the creative side. You’re looking after what is going on the screen, and how you’re telling the story. The writer is there to make it all work. I enjoy being a director because you don’t have to worry about the logistics, but you can just focus on the story.”

The skills that help Lickley handle all three roles came through education and hard work. He has a Master’s Degree in biology and he spends a great deal of time studying animals for his films.

“Understanding what animals are all about and understanding the people that study them was where I began in this career,” he said. “Then I went to the point of trying to tell their stories. It’s important to communicate what you do to the world.”

Lickley has written, produced, and directed documentaries on a wide range of subjects, all of which have something to do with biology.

“I like real stories about real people, and I like animals,” he said. “Generally, my films are about animals as a broad subject, but also the people who work with them. I think documentaries are fantastic for getting people into the world, and it’s nice to show them things that they don’t know about.”

Lickley is known for directing Jane Goodall’s Wild Chimpanzees, and more recently, Born to Be Wild, a touching story about two remarkable women who have dedicated their lives to nurturing orphan orangutans and elephants.

Lickley encourages kids to start making their own films if they want to follow in his steps.

“Get an education. Spend as much time as you possibly can learning about things, and then pick up the tools if you want to be a filmmaker,” he said. “Technology is successful, and everyone can start filming with a small camera. You have a huge advantage now. You can post things on the web and you’ll learn how to tell stories.”

Lickley concluded by sharing some tips about writing with this reporter.

“It’s about doing it,” he said. “Just write. Write stories. Start making your own films. Just do it! The Nike slogan [Just Do It!] is really true now. The tools are there. You don’t need 20 years of experience. You can still make really interesting films. It’s about storytelling, and that’s what writing is, trying to tell a story.”

 

Check out my interview with director David Lickley @Scholastic Inc, first published at http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3756001

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About Cassandra Hsiao

Cassandra Hsiao is a senior at OCSA (Orange County School of the Arts). Her work has been nationally recognized by the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards and National Student Poets Program. She has been chosen as finalists of playwriting competitions held by California Young Playwrights, The Blank Theatre, Writopia Labs, and Princeton University. Her poetry, essays and reviews have appeared in TeenReads, Jet Fuel Review, Feminine Inquiry, Aerie International and more. She also conducts print and on-camera interviews as a Star Reporter and Film Critic for multiple online outlets. She won a National Gracie Award in Student Online Video Host Category by The Alliance for Women in Media Foundation . https://twitter.com/Cassandra_Hsiao

Posted on April 8, 2011, in Interviews, Press Conferences and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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