The Princess Bride Movie Review

THe Princess Bride by William Goldman

THe Princess Bride by William Goldman

The Princess Bride.

Made in 1987 and yet, it’s still being quoted today. A tale of “True love and high adventure”. To put it simply, a modern classic that will entrance and thrill generations to come. Not to say that this movie is just for boys – it’s one of the funniest, most original and romantic (but not soppy) movies I’ve seen in a long time.

Narrated by a grandfather reading “The Princess Bride” to his sick grandson, audiences will be electrified by this daring story filled to the brim with swordfights, wild beasts, and passionate kisses. Buttercup, a stunningly beautiful girl is devastated by the loss of her true love, Westley. When Prince Humperdinck chooses her to be his wife, the queen, a series of adventures are set off into an uncontrollable whirlwind. She meets Vizzinni, a greedy mercenary philosopher; Fezzik, the gentle rhyming giant; Inigo, the Spainard whose sword is his best friend; and the mysterious man in black.

Based on the novel by William Goldman, The Princess Bride stays true to the book and the hilarious, swashbuckling, yet meaningful fable at the core. The beauty of this film lies not in its cheesy special effects, but in the flawless storytelling and crisp, unique dialogue (“Inconceivable!”). I believe that if The Princess Bride had been made today, I would be sorely disappointed. Too many visuals would distract audiences from the main story.

Even in 1987, director Rob Reiner could bring the plot to life. All the characters are as if I imagined them, fully embodying the strengths and flaws of each one. The cast was right-on perfect, most notably Cary Elwes as the good-looking Westley with his dry sense of humor and Mandy Patinkin as the revengeful swordsman. They have a few of the best lines in the movie and pull them off flawlessly – sarcastic and funny.

Call me a movie nerd, but there is more than just an epic, riproaring, rumbustious escapade with eel-infested waters and cliffs of insanity. This will fly over kids’ heads, but the barely hinted undertone of Rob Reiner’s cynicism of happily ever after fairy tales and the satire found in all of his movies will add even more to the overall epicness of The Princess Bride. After all, it isn’t your usual Disney princess “once-upon-a-time” and “the-end” cliché. With its timeless humor and spirit of adventure, families will fall in love with this wacky, charming saga. This makes the perfect movie to relax on Friday night in your Snuggies with some hot cocoa and popcorn, whether you’re nine or ninety-nine.

(Hot cocoa and popcorn? Some might say it’s a strange combination, but that’s exactly what The Princess Bride is. Romance, comedy, and adventure have never embraced each other until The Princess Bride came along.) Ages 5+

 

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About Cassandra Hsiao

Cassandra Hsiao is a senior at OCSA (Orange County School of the Arts). Her work has been nationally recognized by the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards and National Student Poets Program. She has been chosen as finalists of playwriting competitions held by California Young Playwrights, The Blank Theatre, Writopia Labs, and Princeton University. Her poetry, essays and reviews have appeared in TeenReads, Jet Fuel Review, Feminine Inquiry, Aerie International and more. She also conducts print and on-camera interviews as a Star Reporter and Film Critic for multiple online outlets. She won a National Gracie Award in Student Online Video Host Category by The Alliance for Women in Media Foundation . https://twitter.com/Cassandra_Hsiao

Posted on February 3, 2013, in Movie Reviews and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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